To Paradise – Soundscape

Part of the audio of our short documentary David Attenborough: Sir Joseph Banks – Endeavour includes some of the stunning soundscape ‘To Paradise’ designed and created by David McSherry.

To Paradise has been composed to accompany the Joseph Banks: A Great Endeavour exhibition at the Collection, Lincoln, and David has written about the piece and some of the details of how some of the sounds were captured, and the thinking behind them. To Paradise can be heard on the Soundwall at The Collection Until May 11th 2014
10.30am and 2.30pm Monday – Friday
10.30am, 12.30pm and 2.30pm Saturday and Sunday

Extraxt from David McSherry’s Blog  –

A multi-channel sound work for Joseph Banks: A Great Endeavour an exhibition about the passionate botanist and explorer who joined James Cook aboard the Endeavour to explore unchartered lands. The Collection, Lincoln.

The 25 minute piece begins with field recordings made in Bardney Lime Woods in Banks’ home county of Lincolnshire. Rooks, blue tits, warblers and the wind in the trees set the scene for this sonic voyage which charts Banks’ expedition to Tahiti in the first leg of Cook’s first great voyage in 1768.

Banks’ first entry in his journal marks the start of the voyage. Departing smoothly from the busy port of Plymouth, the Endeavour sails to Madeira, Rio de Janeiro on to stormy Cape Horn and then across the Pacific to the crashing waves of Matahavi Bay in Tahiti. Here, the gentle soundscape of rural Lincolnshire gives way to the excited lorikeets, Polynesian starlings and cicadas of tropical Tahiti. The sounds of singing, drumming and nose flutes represent the indigenous peoples he encountered and respected.

The piece concludes with the ebb and flow of Tahiti’s surf and William Cowper’s poem The Task, which imagines Banks as an adventurous bee, busily foraging for pollen.

Read more and listen to ‘To Paradise’ via  David McSherry’s blog here

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s